Below is an 7-step guide to learning anything in 48 hours. Applied with the techniques and tips from my book, ‘How to Learn Almost Anything in 48 Hours’, it will create a structured process for you to follow and make sure you’re on track to achieve learning success.

 1. Gather materials and resources to learn (Up to 3 hours)

You’ve made the choice to learn something. The first step then is to get all the resources and materials you need to get started. For example, if you were to learn a language, you will need to access books, audio, websites, apps, people that can help, native speakers, and the list goes on.

 2. Develop memorisation strategy (Up to 2 hours)

Once you have gathered all you need, make a decision on the memory techniques you plan to use from this book. For example if you’re wanting to learn lengthy lists such as the presidents of the Unites States, then you would look at using The Method of Loci. If you’re wanting to acquire knowledge fast, you will look at developing a Mind Map of the content and using visualisation methods such as SMASHIN SCOPE to create engaging associations in your mind with the knowledge. Reading this book will help with identifying the most relevant strategy. The more practise you get at identifying which memory techniques to use, the better you become at developing memorisation strategy.

 3. Organise / prioritise materials (Up to 1 hour)

With your strategy developed, the next step is to organise the materials and resources you have to fit inside your strategy. If your strategy was to memorise all 1500 French phrases, then you will need to make sure you have your 1500 French phrases set out in a way that will make it easy for you to go through them one by one. One method of doing that is to enter or copy and paste each phrase into a spreadsheet so that it becomes easy to access.

 4. Create Accountability (Up to 1 hour)

It is important to share your learning task with a family member, friend, or anyone else that you can be held responsible to for your actions. Accountability to others creates motivation to get you going so that you don’t let others down. We generally do tend to slack off if we are accountable to only ourselves.

5. Memorise (Up to 30 hours)

Once you have all your materials and have developed your process for learning it is time for action. It is best to start with short periods of memorisation rather than long. The reason for this is that it is less strain on the brain, you will complete a set memorisation period quickly, and as you get better you will increase your time. If you start with longer memorisation periods then it will overwhelm you very quickly. Keep it short and simple.

 6. Review (spaced repetition) (Up to 1-hour)

Once you have memorised you will need to go back and review your work. This helps to store your memorisation in long-term memory. Depending on what you’re learning of course, the rule for spaced repetition is to review an hour later, then a day later, a week later, a month, three months, six months and finally a year.

7. Practise and apply (Up to 10 hours)

Once you have memorised and used techniques to achieve what you want, you will need to practise to give yourself feedback on how your memorisation went. This is the test of how much you have learned. If you had indeed memorised 1500 French phrases, go into an environment where French is spoken and have conversations. Are you able to speak it? What works? What doesn’t? Note all these down and figure why these were the case.

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